“Meet Ya” Guide to Arch Madness 2017 for the Sweet 16:

*Post written by James Wethington, library assistant of the University Archives and Special Collections.

*Item descriptions written by Deanna Engler, library associate of University Archives and Special Collections.

As a reminder, Arch Madness begins next Monday, February 27th and ends on April 1st! Take some time and read about the items in this year’s competition from the various regions.

Communal

harmonist_sundial

1821 Harmonist Sundial Replica

The 1821 Harmonist sundial is part of the New Harmony Collection.  This collection contains material about the Harmonist of New Harmony, Indiana.  The Harmonists moved to New Harmony is 1814 and this sundial is a replica of the one created by founder George Rapp, which was attached to his home.

 

 

 

 

stelle_painting

1963 “The Ultimate Frontier” Stelle Painting

The 1963 “Ultimate Frontier” painting is part of the Stelle Community Collection. This collection contains material about the Stelle communal group.   Stelle community began in 1963 in California and later moved to northern Illinois. This painting is a visual representation of founder Richard Kieninger’s work The Ultimate Frontier.

 

 

 

 

 

hey_beatnik

1974 “Hey Beatnik!” Publication

The 1974 “Hey Beatnik!” is part of The Farm Collection. This collection contains material about The Farm communal group. The Farm was established in 1971 in Tennessee. This is one of the earliest published books from The Farm, and discusses life on The Farm and founder Stephen Gaskin’s philosophy.

Region

 

 

shiloh_farms

Shiloh Farms Organic Food Company Label

The Shiloh Farms Organic Food Company label is part of the Don Janzen Collection.  This collection contains material about the academic work of Don Janzen, a retired anthropologist who spent much of his academic career researching and studying communalism and communal groups.  The Shiloh Farms company label is part of a larger collection of material about the Shiloh Community, a post-World War II community practicing sustainable farming and business.

 

Regional

mead-johnson-product-sample

1960’s Mead Johnson Product Sample

The 1960’s Mead Johnson Co. product sample is part of the Mead Johnson Co. Collection.  This collection contains material about Mead Johnson’s Evansville plant.  The Evansville facility specialized in pediatric nutrition and manufacturing.  It was here that Enfamil was produced, the first routine infant formula to have the nutritional composition of breast milk.

 

 

 

 

 

 

travelling-briefcase

1950’s Servel Travelling Salesman Suitcase

The 1950’s Servel traveling salesman suitcase is part of the J. Henry Ballman Collection.  This collection contains material about Servel and Arkla, local companies that produced heating and cooling systems.  The suitcase visually demonstrated the new heating and cooling technologies available for businesses.

 

 

 

mason_hat

Dr. Charles Rochelle 33rd Degree Masonic Hat

The Dr. Charles Rochelle 33rd degree Masonic hat is part of the Dr. Charles Rochelle Collection.  This collection contains materials about Dr. Rochelle and his lifetime as an educator.  Dr. Rochelle was one of the first African-Americans to receive a doctorate in education from UC Berkeley in 1942.  Dr. Rochelle’s Masonic hat is just one of the many accomplishments that he achieved throughout his lifetime.

 

 

helen_wallace_sketch

Helen Wallace 1926 Movie Sketch.

The 1926 Helen Wallace “The Greater Glory” movie sketch is part of the Helen Wallace Collection.  This collection contains material about Helen Wallace’s art, her fashion sketches, and her time with the Chicago Herald newspaper.  Helen Wallace studied at the Chicago Art Institute and this sketch shows the depth of her talent, as well as how movie trailers have changed since the 1920’s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special

alchemy_book

1603 Works of Paracelsus

The 1603 Collected Works of Paracelsus is one of the rare books in our Special Collections.  Published in 1603, this two-volume set contains the books and writings on alchemy, magic, and occult philosophies of Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheimc, better known as Paracelsus.

 

 

german_helmet

World War 1 Pickelhaube Helmet

The World War I Pickelhaube helmet is part of the Roy Kennedy Collection.  This collection contains material about WWI trench warfare, specifically from the German side.  The Pickelhaube was primarily used by the German military in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and is still used today as part of parade and ceremonial uniforms.

 

 

 

 

 

titanic_newspaper

1912 Titanic Newspaper

The 1912 Titanic disaster newspaper is part of the Miscellaneous Memorabilia Collection.  This collection contains material from various unknown sources and covers a wide range of topics, both locally and nationally.  This edition of the Chicago Saturday Blaze newspaper came out just two weeks after the disaster, and is an example of journalism of the early twentieth century.

 

 

 

 

moonraker-poster

1979 James Bond Movie Poster

The 1979 James Bond “Moonraker” movie poster is part of the Jeanne Suhrenreich Collection.  This collection contains material about movies, theater, and music.  “Moonraker” was the highest grossing James Bond movie at 210 million and was only surpasses in 1995 by “Goldeneye.”

 

 

 

 

 

 


University

isue_megaphone

ISUE Megaphone

The ISUE megaphone is part of the University Memorabilia Collection.  This collection contains material documenting the growth of ISUE/USI from 1965 to today.  The megaphone was used during athletic events and even sports the signature of famed UCLA coach John Wooden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

usi-independence-t-shirt

1985 USI Independence T-Shirt

The 1985 USI Independence t-shirt is part of the University Memorabilia Collection. This collection contains material documenting the growth of ISUE/USI from 1965 to today.  Students wore the t-shirt during the independence celebration of 1985.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the-roach

1966 ISUE “The Roach” Newspaper

The 1966 ISUE “Roach” student newspaper is part of the Student Publications Collection.  This collection contains material produced by students at ISUE/USI.  The “Roach” was an unsanctioned student newspaper from the Centennial School, ISUE’s first home.  Depending on whom you ask the name has various meanings, however its “official” one is a dig at the critters scurrying around.

 

 

 

 

usi-seal

Original USI Seal

The original USI seal is part of the University Memorabilia Collection.  This collection contains material documenting the growth of ISUE/USI form 1965 to today.  The first USI seal in 1985 was the old ISUE seal with a slight name change.  It was not until 1990 that USI created its own, original seal.

Have you heard about “Arch Madness”?

*Post written by James Wethington, library assistant of the University Archives and Special Collections.

To celebrate March Madness, the University Archives and Special Collections wants to know what you think is the coolest artifact in the archives. During the month of March, sixteen items from our four areas of collecting are battling for the ultimate prize of becoming USI’s coolest artifact! We are asking students, faculty, staff, and the public to vote each day.

Starting February 27th, the archives will post the artifact teams competing that week. We are asking students, faculty, staff, and public to vote on their favorite artifact each week. The winners of each week will continue to the final showdown to determine the “Coolest Artifact.” Voting is available through polls located on the David L. Rice Library Facebook, Twitter, amUSIngArtifacts, or in person in the University Archives and Special Collections on the third floor of Rice Library. The sixteen artifacts represents the four different areas we collect at the archive such as: University History, Regional History, Special Collections, and Communal Studies.

Here are the regions:

Communal:

Regional:

Special:

University:

Celebrating Black History Month: W.C. Handy

*Post written by James Wethington, library assistant of the University Archives and Special Collections.

Did you know the Tri-State area played a huge part in the history of blues music? Considered “The Father of the American Blues”, W.C. Hardy came to Evansville after the Lauzetta Quartet disbanded around the 1890’s (“W. C. Handy,” n.d.). Handy performed at a barbecue in Henderson, Kentucky in 1896 and met his future wife, Elizabeth (“W. C. Handy,” n.d.). Shortly after, Handy and his family moved to other states until his death in 1958 (The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica, 2012).

Below, the University Archives and Special Collections have some W.C. Handy letters. His letter is to Karl Kae Knecht, cartoonist of the Evansville Courier.  Handy speaks about autobiography, “Father of the Blues”.  He speaks about living in Evansville and his experiences here before his music career started.

 

References

The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica. (2012, July 2). W.C. Handy. Retrieved February 16, 2017, from https://www.britannica.com/biography/W-C-Handy

W. C. Handy. (n.d.). Retrieved February 16, 2017, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W._C._Handy

Celebrating Black History Month: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

*Post written by James Wethington, library assistant of the University Archives and Special Collections.

These two letters have a long history: it was discovered by a student in History 323, Introduction to Archival Practice. Course instructor, Jennifer Greene, reference and archives librarian stated, “From a scale from one to ten with, I was at 55 with excitement. I was more excited knowing the student recognized the SCLC letterhead than the letter itself! That is why he pulled the letter out in the first place”.

This correspondence was between Skyview Acres, located in Sherman, New York, and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in Atlanta, Georgia.  SCLC was involved in the African-American Civil Rights Movements.  These two letters were sent on July 17th and June 23rd, 1963. Exactly, one month later, the March on Washington occurred, where King gave his “I Have a Dream” speech in front of the Lincoln Memorial and continued to fight for civil rights for African-Americans (The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica, n.d.).

It finally happened in 1964 when President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act into law (Carson & Lewis, 2016). Only four years later, Dr. King was shot and killed at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee on April 4, 1968 (Carson & Lewis, 2016). Though his death was untimely, Dr. King left a long-lasting legacy and message for future generations to hear.

References

Carson, C., & Lewis, D. L. (2016, January 29). Martin Luther King, Jr. Retrieved February 13, 2017, from https://www.britannica.com/biography/Martin-Luther-King-Jr

The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica. (n.d.). March on Washington. Retrieved February 13, 2017, from https://www.britannica.com/event/March-on-Washington

Celebrating Black History Month: Dr. Charles Rochelle

*Post written by James Wethington, library assistant of the University Archives and Special Collections.

mss_229-016-charles-rochelle

Dr. Charles Rochelle, n.d.

In honor of Black History Month, we are going to show case prominent African-American who have done amazing work here in Evansville. Over the next few weeks, we are going to learn about these amazing individuals and honor them for their hard work and dedication.

Charles Rochelle was born on April 30, 1895 in Terre Haute, Indiana (“Dr. Charles E. Rochelle” n.d.; “Hoosier State Chronicles”, n.d.). Rochelle served during the First World War with the 375th Engineer Service Battalion of the United States Army in Hattiesburg, Mississippi (“Charles Rochelle Oral History”, n.d.). After the war, Rochelle attended and graduated with a Bachelors of Arts and Masters of Arts in education from Indiana State Teachers College, presently known as Indiana State University (“Hoosier State Chronicles”, n.d.). Rochelle would later became the first African American man to receive a doctorate in education from the University of California at Berkeley (“Charles Rochelle Oral History”, n.d.).

 

He became a social studies teacher at Lincoln High School in Evansville, Indiana (“Rochelle, Charles E.”, n.d.). In 1951, Rochelle began the principal of Lincoln High School (“Hoosier State Chronicles”, n.d.). Rochelle served in numerous organizations in Evansville such as a member of Liberty Baptist Church, Cawthar Shrine Temple, served as a 33rd Degree Mason, board member of the Deaconess Hospital Foundation (“Rochelle, Charles E.”, n.d.), and commander of the Otis Stone post of the American Legion numerous times (Evansville Argus Newspaper Collection, n.d.). Rochelle was married to his wife, Thelma, until her death in 1985; however, Rochelle passed away on April 30, 1993 (“Rochelle, Charles E.”, n.d.).

mss-229-076-charles-and-thelma-rochelle

Left to Right: Dr. Charles Rochelle and Thelma, 1975

Here at the University Archives and Special Collections, Charles Rochelle donated his personal collection of speeches, awards, notes, and photographs. His collection is available at any time you are interested in learning more about Dr. Charles Rochelle.

References

Charles Rochelle Oral History. University of Southern Indiana, University Archives and Special Collections, David L. Rice Library, Evansville, Indiana.

Dr. Charles E. Rochelle (1895 – 1993). (n.d.). Retrieved February 8, 2017, from https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=66665412

Hoosier State Chronicles – Indianapolis Recorder. (n.d.). Retrieved February 8, 2017, from https://newspapers.library.in.gov/

Rochelle, Charles E. (n.d.). Evansville Vanderburgh Public Library. Retrieved February 8, 2017, from http://browning.evpl.org/

Evansville Argus Newspaper Collection. University of Southern Indiana, University Archives and Special Collections, David L. Rice Library, Evansville, Indiana. Retrieved February 8, 2017, from http://library2.usi.edu:8080/cdm/landingpage/collection/Argus

Party Like Its 1828

*Post written by James Wethington, library assistant of the University Archives and Special Collections.

 

Produced by Danish-French cartographer M. Malte-Brun, this atlas presents what the world looked like in 1828.  Born in 1775 and raised in Denmark, Malte-Brun published pamphlets criticizing the Danish crown because of their censorship laws; however, he left for France in 1800 and stayed there till his death in 1826 (The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica, 1998). He founded and joined the Société de Géographie de Paris, the world’s first “Geography Society” in 1821 and served as their first secretary (The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica, 1998). Malte-Brun passed away on December 14, 1826 in Paris (The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica, 1998).

Reference

The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica. (1998, July 20). Conrad Malte-Brun. Retrieved February 7, 2017, from https://www.britannica.com/biography/Conrad-Malte-Brun

Elvis: The One and Only King

img_1198

Original Telegram, 1957

 

 

*Post written by James Wethington, library assistant of the University Archives and Special Collections.

 

 

 

 

Larry Aiken was a well-known radio and television personality in Evansville. He also was a businessman and created his own entertainment and promotion business. In 1957, he received a personal telegram from “the King of Rock and Roll”, Elvis Presley. Due to time constraints, Elvis was unable to attend Aiken’s program and apologizes; however, Elvis sent his best wishes to Aiken and with his career. At this time, Elvis “… dominated the best-seller charts and ushered in the age of rock and roll” (Marsh, 2012). This was the beginning of Elvis’ reign as the King of Rock N’ Roll and his legacy continues on, even after his unfortunate death on August 16, 1977, at the age of forty-two (Marsh, 2012).

Reference

Marsh, D. (2012, August 23). Elvis Presley. Retrieved February 3, 2017, from https://www.britannica.com/biography/Elvis-Presley